Five Hindrances – Buddhism

The Five Hindrances in Buddhism

five hindrences

Introduction

Buddhist writings often reference the Five Hindrances when discussing obstacles in meditation, but if you continue meditating and are aware of the hindrances as they build up inside you, observe the sensation of the hindrance, then let it go. You will learn to recognize each hindrance as it you become more aware of the sensation of each.

1. Sensual Desires

As rain penetrates an ill-thatched house,
So lust penetrates an undeveloped mind.

As rain does not penetrate a well-thatched house,
So lust does not penetrate a well-developed mind.

Dhammapada (13-14)

2. Ill Will (wishing ill will towards another being)

Weeds are the ruin of fields; Ill will is the ruin of people.

Dhammapada (357)

3. Sloth and Torpor

Not arousing oneself from discontent and laziness is the proximate cause for sloth and torpor.

Commentary to the Middle Length Discourses

4. Restlessness and Remorse

Frequently giving unwise attention to a restless mind nourishes restlessness and remorse that is occurring and which has not yet occurred.

SN 46:51

5. Doubt or Uncertainty

“I know of no other single thing that has the power to bring on doubt and to cause doubt to increase, than unwise attention.”

~The Buddha 


See also: 10 Unwholesome ActionsThe 38 Supreme Blessings, Benefits of Meditation

Your Condition is Your Own Making

Your current condition in life is what you have thought it to be; your life is your own creation, so take control for hell sakes. 

“All that man achieves and all that he fails to achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts. In a justly ordered universe, where loss of equipoise would mean total destruction, individual responsibility must be absolute. A man’s weakness and strength, purity, and impurity, are his own, and not another man’s. They are brought about by himself and not by another; and they can only be altered by himself, never by another. His conditions are also his own, and not another man’s. His suffering and his happiness are evolved within. As he thinks, so he is; as he continues to think, so he remains.”

~ James Allen

#Buddha #peace

Consciousness in the 17th Century

 

17th Century Representation of Consciousness;  Wikipedia Creative Commons terms of use
17th Century Representation of Consciousness

 The Mind is like magic!

I love this kind of stuff. Anything about the mind interests me. The mind is a Pandora’s Box full of unknown (unconscious) wonder and potential. It feels similar to “real magic” to me, and it seems this was the case in the 17th century as well. That amazes me; as little as we know today (more and more each day with VMRI, and so forth) yet all the years back to the 17th century, very little seems to have progressed in the science of the conscious mind or consciousness itself.
 

Where and what is Consciousness?

Meditating, dream analysis, and inner work, cultivates awareness, thus consciousness. You become conscious of your world only when you become aware of the world around you; consciousness is awareness. 
 
I read and listen to long-time Buddhist practitioners, Buddhist Monks and Nuns, and meditation practitioners (sans Buddhist teachings.) One thing they all have in common is the understanding that meditation, whether part of Buddhist traditions or not, requires practice. Every book, video, audio I read, watch, or listen to all have the same direction: practice. They themselves use terms such as “…my meditation practice…” or “…when I practice meditation…” My point is that meditation starts as an awkward, vulnerable, and at times embarrassing action that we have only read, heard, or viewed; it is difficult to start, but starting is no different than six or ten years from now- practice, practice, practice. There is no end to practicing meditation or learning the Dhamma, if you choose, as both are life-changing regardless how much you practice; however, the more you practice, the more your suffering subsides to nothing.