Consciousness in the 17th Century

 

17th Century Representation of Consciousness;  Wikipedia Creative Commons terms of use
17th Century Representation of Consciousness

 The Mind is like magic!

I love this kind of stuff. Anything about the mind interests me. The mind is a Pandora’s Box full of unknown (unconscious) wonder and potential. It feels similar to “real magic” to me, and it seems this was the case in the 17th century as well. That amazes me; as little as we know today (more and more each day with VMRI, and so forth) yet all the years back to the 17th century, very little seems to have progressed in the science of the conscious mind or consciousness itself.
 

Where and what is Consciousness?

Meditating, dream analysis, and inner work, cultivates awareness, thus consciousness. You become conscious of your world only when you become aware of the world around you; consciousness is awareness. 
 
I read and listen to long-time Buddhist practitioners, Buddhist Monks and Nuns, and meditation practitioners (sans Buddhist teachings.) One thing they all have in common is the understanding that meditation, whether part of Buddhist traditions or not, requires practice. Every book, video, audio I read, watch, or listen to all have the same direction: practice. They themselves use terms such as “…my meditation practice…” or “…when I practice meditation…” My point is that meditation starts as an awkward, vulnerable, and at times embarrassing action that we have only read, heard, or viewed; it is difficult to start, but starting is no different than six or ten years from now- practice, practice, practice. There is no end to practicing meditation or learning the Dhamma, if you choose, as both are life-changing regardless how much you practice; however, the more you practice, the more your suffering subsides to nothing.

 

 

 

 

 

Author: John B

I'm alive.

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